CDNIS loses key IB delivery team members as CIS accreditation stalls

CDNIS administration and Members suffered another setback as key staff choose not to renew and CIS accreditation seems to stall out.

Photo: Accreditation stalls out for CDNIS for now. Keep pushing.


 

The Canadian International School was rocked by a wave of resignations of key educators responsible for delivering their IB programmes in the same week the International Baccalaureate team conducted their pentannual inspection and the Council for International Schools visited.  

As the school enters caits critical “ contract renewal deadline” period, more staff joined the exodus produced by resignations and widespread firings over the past year. Activist group ComeTogether noted, in an email communication, that the “voluntary turnover rate for ESF teachers at the end of the 2013-14 academic year was 6.98%” (source: ESF Annual Report 2013-14), with an average of 7.2% over the past four years.”

By comparison, that at CDNIS was ranging from 12-14% (same source) in recent years. Over 57 key staff members have left in the past year. Off the record sources suggest up to 30 could leave in this renewal period, driving percentages higher. School communications claimed delivered on December 1 of  last week explained, “The turnover rate of 17% of our teachers is in line with our average turnover rate of 16% [period unspecified], which is also very similar to our  peer schools in Hong Kong.”

The more recent to announce their departure include:

  • International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme Coordinator/Theory of Knowledge Coordinator
  • Middle Years Programme Coordinator/Extended Essay Coordinator
  • Primary Years Programme Literacy Coordinator
  • Lower Schools Mathematics Specialist.

This will leave the schools with no Mathematics Specialist, as the other specialist was fired in June and has not been replaced.

From ComeTogether:

Programs affected by the non-renewals include (in addition to the above)

  • Upper School Math (Department Head)
  • Upper School English (DP)
  • Upper School Science/Chemistry/ESS
  • Lower School Performing Arts (2 vacancies)
  • Lower School Guidance Counselor
  • LS Grade Leader (several Grade Leaders were fired in June)

Others fired during 2015 include:

  • Head Librarian
  • Lower School Principal Dylan Hughes
  • Lower School Vice Principal Kathy Nutting
  • Nine staff members on the last day of school.
  • Head of IT

In addition, Upper School Vice Principal Chris Coates resigned in June. He has recently been hired as the Principal of the Upper School at The International School in Macao.

Over 57 key staff members have left in the past year.

Firings by the new Head of School, Gregg Maloberti, has seen the school mired in lawsuits at the Labour Tribunal as seen here, here, and here.

Accreditation will have to wait

Council of International Schools accreditation will need to wait.  The CIS accreditation team visited from November 30th to December 1, according to school communications. The IB team visited at the same time.

The Canadian International School is non-accredited outlier among the most expensive schools in Hong Kong.

According to a letter sent to parents signed by the Head of School, Gregg Maloberti, “CIS has suggested that we not consider undertaking a full accreditation visit for at least another year. After completing our work on reviewing the vision and mission of the school and completing another special report updating progress in the six areas, a date will be established for restarting the accreditation process.”

Examining the list of International schools with and without accreditation on the CIS site show 23 schools with accreditation. The Canadian International School is non-accredited outlier among the most expensive schools in Hong Kong.

 

Andrew Work

Andrew Work

Andrew Work is the CEO of New Work Media, publisher of Harbour Times.
He has run The Canadian Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong, founded The Lion Rock Institute and has over 25 years engagement in media, politics, policy and community engagement.
Andrew Work