CDNIS appoints new interim head, keeps mum on Maloberti

The CDNIS Board of Governors has chosen a new interim head. David Baird arrived at CDNIS last week. He looks forward to “reengagement with the OSSD programme”.

Canadian International School (CDNIS) has a new interim head, so says a letter that the teaching institution’s Board of Governors sent out to top administrators on 30 May.

“After a vigorous recruitment process, the Board has voted unanimously to appoint Mr. David Baird as our Interim Head of School,” the letter read. “CDNIS is fortunate to have such a highly qualified, dedicated educator to inspire and lead CDNIS for the coming two years.”

A video attached to the letter reveals Baird’s career background. Most recently, he served as the  Founding Head of School of Coast Mountain Academy in Squamish, British Columbia, Canada and Executive Principal at Maple Leaf International School in Dalian, China.

He has also worked at Council of International Schools (CIS) and led the CIS accreditation team for an international school in Hong Kong in 2010.

However, CDNIS made no mention of the fate of Head of School Gregg Maloberti, whose contract will expire in June 2017. Since the interim head of school’s contract starts this summer, the two contracts will overlap by a year.

Maloberti has been a centre of controversy in the school over the past two years.  In 2015, he sacked former Principal (Lower School) Dylan Hughes, former Vice Principal (Primary) Kathy Nutting,  and another nine teachers, to the dismay of many staff members, students, and parents. The action led to legal action in subsequent months.

Now the Board of Governors is looking to turn the page. They indicate in the letter that they have begun “a process to repair the bonds and restore unity in our school” and quote Baird’s pledge to “bring teachers, staff, students and parents through difficult times with a sense of order and faith that we could overcome the challenges”.

Baird also sent out an e-mail addressed to the CDNIS community, briefly illustrating his goals regarding the curricula offered at the school. He described himself as a “firm believer in all three programmes of the IB”, and promised to “work with the CDNIS community to further enhance the programmes’ reach and impact”. He also noted that he looks forward to “re-engagement with the [Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD)] programme”.

CDNIS’s OSSD accreditation has been threatened by the exit of OSSD-certified teachers. The school was also denied CIS accreditation last year and will face a decision by the International Baccalaureate Organisation (IBO) on its IB accreditation in 2017.